Safe Agreement Startup


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SAFE agreements are a relatively new type of investment created by Y Combinator in 2013. These agreements are concluded between a company and an investor and create potential future capital in the company for the investor in exchange for immediate money to the company. SAFE turns into equity in a subsequent funding cycle, but only if a specific trigger event (as described in the agreement) takes place. As the security of a single flexible document without many trading conditions, start-ups and investors save money in legal fees and reduce the time spent negotiating investment terms. Startups and investors generally have only one point to negotiate: the valuation cap. Since a safe does not have an expiry date or maturity date, no time or money should be spent on extending maturities, reviewing interest rates or otherwise. Apart from Y Combinator, SAFE is tested and used by startups in the crowdfunding markets. In 2020, the number of non-convertible notes (for example. B SAFE and kiss notes) used by pre-financing companies is just as widespread (58%) The number of convertible bonds issued. If companies become more well known to SAFE from the beginning, this rather young security may have found its ideal niche in the offers of Title III, also known as crowdinvesting for all investors. A “SAFE” is an agreement between an investor and an entity that grants the investor rights to the company`s future equity, which are similar to a share warrant, unless a certain price per share is set at the time of the initial investment. The SAFE investor receives future shares in the event of an investment price cycle or liquidity event. SAFEs are supposed to offer start-ups a simpler mechanism to apply for upfront financing than convertible bonds.

These three points can make a decisive contribution to attracting investors to the company. They also carry a lower risk, often associated with other types of investments. In addition, SAFEs are a kind of problem solver for start-ups. There are some specific issues that are resolved and these are briefly addressed below. Technical problems like this can lead startup creators to find themselves in a swamp where they have given up more ownership than they had anticipated. When SAFEs or other convertible instruments are issued, it is essential to keep the tabs on the Cap table. The smart thing for founders who can`t do mathematics is to hire a lawyer who can. For a growing start-up, the company will probably find more money. As a start-up investor, I`m not interested in being reimbursed. The risk associated with a start-up is high, so I hope that in the event of a high risk, there will be a potential for a strong upward trend.

That is why I would like my SAFE to be “converted” to equity at a later date. Basically, as soon as someone decides to invest in the company in a “price cycle”, my SAFE becomes shares of the company. As a start-up, you come in agreement with other companies, suppliers, contractors, investors and many others. A lesser-known agreement is the Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE). These agreements can be important for the success of a startup, but not all SAFE agreements are equal. However, if the start-up`s valuation is below the upper limit, SAFE then converts the actual valuation, so that investors end up having more of the business – their investment now gives them a larger share.

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